liturgical syntax errors

At the Hirshhorn that afternoon I touched my hands to glowing glass sensors that converted my pulse into ripples across a shallow pool. Soft blue lighting turned these streams into a play of light across the wall, interrupted or completed by the silhouettes of passing museumgoers. It’s impossible to know how much of the lightContinue reading “liturgical syntax errors”

lectio divina: mt 16:13–20

You asked your disciples, who do you say that I am. And this is a good question, to which Peter gave the only good answer, you are the Christ, the son of the living God. You have been asking me the same question and I gave you a strange answer, or rather you gave meContinue reading “lectio divina: mt 16:13–20”

it’s not just work

Last year I wrote a piece called “It’s just work” about how I manage grad school and its tendency to expand to fill all my time. I was reminded of that piece recently after a conversation I had with a Dominican priest, who remarked that one of the ways religious life works is that itContinue reading “it’s not just work”

“Woe to the shepherds who mislead and scatter the flock of my pasture”

There’s a lot to be said for the Old Testament God. Tomorrow morning I will read at Mass from the book of the prophet Jeremiah: Woe to the shepherds who mislead and scatter the flock of my pasture, says the LORD. Therefore, thus says the LORD, the God of Israel, against the shepherds who shepherdContinue reading ““Woe to the shepherds who mislead and scatter the flock of my pasture””

Lessons from Valladolid: On Being Decent in an Indecent Age

When a Christian is caught between a political economy hostile to human flourishing and a Church all too often comfortable with the status quo, it is demoralizing to have recourse to an ugly, embattled public square. Who wants to have life-or-death debates in a cold professional setting? In what universe is pitting hostile voices againstContinue reading “Lessons from Valladolid: On Being Decent in an Indecent Age”

“Answer the question really asked. And answer it with your life.”

Shag: Man comes to the door, asks if the King’s inside. Tell me. What’s he really asking? Garnet: He’s asking, ‘May I kill your guest? Will you open the door for me to kill him?’ He’s asking, ‘Will you hand over to me one more victim to add to the long slow massacre that isContinue reading ““Answer the question really asked. And answer it with your life.””

Catholic priests don’t wear suits to Mass. So why so many tuxedos at the Met Gala?

kritischetheologie: glintglimmergleam: @ceeturnalia @ameliasscanwells this gal went OFF and i love it whole thread here @catherineaddington the wires are crossing! Hah, thanks y’all! I wrote up my tweetstorm for America Magazine today: This is a culture that buries bones in its altars, builds chapels out of skulls and carries the broken yet whole body of ChristContinue reading “Catholic priests don’t wear suits to Mass. So why so many tuxedos at the Met Gala?”

Sirach 34:21–27

If one sacrifices ill-gotten goods, the offering is blemished; the gifts of the lawless are not acceptable. The Most High is not pleased with the offerings of the ungodly, nor for a multitude of sacrifices does he forgive sins. Like one who kills a son before his father’s eyes is the person who offers aContinue reading “Sirach 34:21–27”

Cartas de América #15: if you want slavery abolished, you gotta do it yourself

Earlier this year, I told you about a project I’m working on for which the working title is Repent! (And Have It Notarized.) C’mon, that’s a way better dissertation title than “‘Ni un sólo maravedí que suyo sea’: the theology of restitution in New Spain,” right? Anyway, here’s a quick refresher: in 1552, Bartolomé deContinue reading “Cartas de América #15: if you want slavery abolished, you gotta do it yourself”