accumulating “small acts of self-respect”

My friend Amanda made a video today about the process of learning self-love. I encourage you to watch it, and hear her thoughts before I ramble into mine. I’ve always found Amanda to be a generous companion when it comes to learning things that can seem nebulous at first. Whether that’s her willingness to take timeContinue reading “accumulating “small acts of self-respect””

Cementerio Británico, Buenos Aires

 Cementerio Británico, Buenos Aires 9 de mayo del 2015 That’s the first Orthodox cross I ever saw on a grave. On either side of an austere Anglican chapel holding court in Chacarita are rows and rows of these three-bar crosses, poking out into the leaves in memory eternal. They stud the British cemetery in BuenosContinue reading “Cementerio Británico, Buenos Aires”

in the garden of the Lord

I was about to start writing this post when the Ferguson announcement started. I’ve been watching coverage saddened but not stunned, like I was when it all began back in August. Of course, it didn’t begin in August. I know that now. Tonight I did what I always do and I turned to the musicContinue reading “in the garden of the Lord”

the saints Catherine

Photo via my friend Amanda, 2 February 2014 My parents say they called me Catherine because it’s a classic, the name of many saints and queens, the kind of name that never goes out of style. But of course in our churches a baptismal name is also a point of entry into tradition, uniting aContinue reading “the saints Catherine”

The Forsaken

Highly religious parents are significantly more likely than their less-religious counterparts to reject their children for being gay – a finding that social-service workers believe goes a long way toward explaining why LGBT people make up roughly five percent of the youth population overall, but an estimated 40 percent of the homeless-youth population. The CenterContinue reading “The Forsaken”

Mother Maria in wartime

the martyr Mother Maria of Paris (1891-1945) Mother Maria Skobtsova, by then already a survivor of the Russian Revolution, reflects as the Second World War rages through Europe: Human nature, fallen, permeated with sin and its consequences, is a heavy thing. If we try to understand what happens to the human soul in moments ofContinue reading “Mother Maria in wartime”

Holy Saturday

While Christ lay dead the widowed worldWore willow green for hope undone:Till, when bright Easter dews impearledThe chilly burial earth,All north and south, all east and west,Flushed rosy in the arising sun;Hope laughed, and Faith resumed her rest,And Love remembered mirth.  “Easter Even,” Christina Rossetti (x) It is hard for me to accept that itContinue reading “Holy Saturday”

Shelly Rambo, “Spirit and Trauma”

Holy Saturday provides a vocabulary consonant with being a survivor. It is a place of alienation, confusion, and godforsakenness. But it is also a place that is continually covered over, dismissed, rendered unintelligible, and therefore subsumed under operative narratives of the progression of death to life. It is important to mark out this space pneumatologicallyContinue reading “Shelly Rambo, “Spirit and Trauma””

A ‘citizen’ is always unfree

A ‘citizen’ is always unfree, always feels the whole weight of oppressive power upon him, of public opinion, tradition, everyday life, the history of his country. We all know this, because it all took place in our own lives. We know that in the time of the Russian civil war, choice implied death, imprisonment, exile,Continue reading “A ‘citizen’ is always unfree”

the folly of the cross

The Gospel confounds. The Gospel enrages. The Gospel inspires. If we choose to continue following the Gospel, we will continue confounding the world. And yes, we just might be crucified. But, as Dorothy Day once wrote, “The most effective action we can take is to try to conform our lives to the folly of theContinue reading “the folly of the cross”